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T
Tattoo Studio (1)
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U
Uniform Supply
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V
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Y
Youth Services (8)

Retail

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Our members are presented equally regardless of their alphabetical positioning.
For an alphabetized list of these results CLICK HERE.



Savers
Gabe Lamestra
Community Donation Manager
10720 W. Indian School Road
Phoenix, AZ 85037
Visit our Website
623-872-9436
Member Since: 2019

The Savers family of stores is a for-profit, global thrift retailer offering great quality, gently used clothing, accessories and household goods. Our business model of purchasing, reselling and recycling gives communities a smart way to shop and keeps more than 650 million pounds of used goods from landfills each year.

We also help more than 120 nonprofit organizations by paying them for donated goods, which supports their vital community programs and services. Our brands comprise Savers (in the U.S), Value Village (in the U.S. and Canada), Unique (in the U.S.), Village des Valeurs (in Quebec) and Savers Australia. 

All in all, we operate over 330 locations and have 22,000 employees.
 


2 Share, A Unique Boutique
Cherlynn Berry
Owner
5805 W. Glendale Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85301
Visit our Website
623-764-7701
Member Since: 2020

Gift Shop in downtown Glendale that works with many local artisans and Non-Profits.

All the King's Flags, Inc.
Kerry King
President
3333 N. 24th Street
Phoenix, AZ 85016
Visit our Website
602-956-5999
Fax: 602-381-8577
Member Since: 2020

Contact Form  More Info  Map 

We've been providing quality flags, flagpoles and custom flags with nationwide service since 1965. Please browse our store to find flags of many sizes for all states, countries, military, historic, holidays, events, advertising, sports teams and free-standing flag presentation sets. We also carry windsocks, spinners, pennants, decals, lapel pins and much more!

Fry's Food Stores of Arizona, Inc. #625
Store Manager
6611 W. Bell Road
Glendale , AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-334-2940
Member Since: 2016

History of Kroger
In 1883, Barney Kroger invested his life savings of $372 to open a grocery store at 66 Pearl Street in downtown Cincinnati. The son of a merchant, he ran his business with a simple motto: “Be particular. Never sell anything you would not want yourself.”

It was a credo that would serve The Kroger Co. well over the next 130 years as the supermarket business evolved into a variety of formats aimed at satisfying the ever-changing needs of shoppers.

With more than 2,400 stores in 31 states under two dozen banners and annual sales of more than $96 billion, Kroger today ranks as one of the world’s largest retailers.

Many aspects of the company’s business today trace their roots to Mr. Kroger’s early efforts to serve his customers. Consider two specialty departments that today are regular fixtures in the company’s supermarkets" bakeries and meat and seafood shops. In the early 1900s, most grocers bought their bread from independent bakeries. But Mr. Kroger, always pursuing quality as the key ingredient for profit, recognized that if he baked his own bread, he could reduce the price for his customers and still make money. So, in 1901, he became the first grocer in the country to establish his own bakeries. He was also the first to sell meats and groceries under one roof.

Mr. Kroger also spied the promise of increasing his income by manufacturing the products he sold. It began in that first Kroger store on Pearl St. When farmers came to town with their produce, he bought far more cabbage than he could expect his customers to buy. He took the cabbage home to his mother who, following her favorite recipe, turned it into tangy sauerkraut that proved hugely popular with his German customers.

The manufacturing effort born in that back room was the beginning of what is today one of the largest food manufacturing businesses in America. Kroger operates 37 food processing facilities that make thousands of products ranging from bread, cookies and milk to soda pop, ice cream and peanut butter. About 40% of the more than 12,000 private-label items found in the company’s stores today are made at one of Kroger’s manufacturing plants. These Corporate Brands today account for an impressive 24% of Kroger’s total store dollar sales, providing the company with a significant strategic advantage.

Yet in many other respects, Mr. Kroger would hardly recognize the company today. In response to customers who want the convenience of one-stop shopping, stores have grown much larger to accommodate more variety and more merchandise. New combination stores, Kroger’s primary format, today average 67,000 square feet or more. The company’s Marketplace stores, which offer expanded general merchandise, average 125,000 square feet, and multi-department stores under the Fred Meyer banner truly tip the scales at over 165,000 square feet.

The shelves today are packed with up to 50,000 items ranging from basic grocery staples to more innovative fare such as organic vegetables, natural foods, and hot meals ready to eat. Kroger operates more than 1,940 in-store pharmacies that fill more than 160 million prescriptions a year. Its floral shops ring up enough business to make Kroger the world’s largest florist. And Kroger has installed fuel centers in more than 1,180 locations to appeal to customers who want to gas up their cars during their shopping trip.

Mergers have played a key role in Kroger’s growth over the years. In 1983, 100 years after the company’s founding, Kroger merged with Dillon Companies Inc. in Kansas to become a coast-to-coast operator of food, drug and convenience stores.

The biggest merger in Kroger’s history came in 1999, when the company teamed up with Fred Meyer, Inc. in a $13 billion deal that created a supermarket chain with the broadest geographic coverage and widest variety of formats in the food retailing industry. The merger also enabled Kroger to generate huge economies of scale in purchasing, manufacturing, information systems and logistics. In an era when many larger mergers failed, the success of the Kroger-Fred Meyer merger stands out.

Today Kroger offers a store format for nearly every kind of shopper. Our formats include supermarkets, multi-department stores, Marketplace stores, price-impact stores, convenience and fine jewelry stores.

Throughout its rich history, Kroger has served as an innovator and pioneer in the food retail industry. During the 1930s, it was the first grocery chain to routinely monitor product quality and scientifically test foods. In 2012, the company’s long-standing commitment to food safety and quality earned it the highly prestigious Black Pearl Award, awarded to only one company each year by the International Association for Food Protection.

In 1972, Kroger became the first grocery retailer in America to test an electronic scanner. It was installed in a store in suburban Cincinnati, and visitors from around the country attended the event. Technology continues to play an important role in Kroger’s store operations today. In just the last few years, Kroger pioneered QueVision, an innovative faster checkout program that has reduced the time customers wait in line to check out, on average, from four minutes in 2010 to less than 30 seconds in stores today.

Also in the ‘70s, the company became the first grocer to formalize consumer research, interviewing 4,000 shoppers the first year. In 2012, the company listened to 1,993,227 customers, who provided invaluable feedback and insights.

Innovation is also at the heart of Kroger’s sustainability efforts, aimed at improving today to protect tomorrow. In the mid-2000s, Kroger created a process to rescue safe, edible fresh products and donate them quickly to local food banks. This innovation has been replicated by other retailers and today fresh products make up more than half of the food distributed nationwide by Feeding America, America’s largest food bank network.

With dozens of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers around the country, Kroger also has one of the largest privately-owned truck fleets in the country. Trucks moving merchandise and supplies among our stores, warehouses and manufacturing plants log nearly 297 million miles annually.

The business principles that made the first Kroger store successful in 1883 ''" service, selection and value ''" continue to guide the company’s operations today. From one tiny grocery store in Cincinnati more than a century ago, Barney Kroger laid the foundation for what today ranks as one of the largest companies in America.


Savers
Dave VanBockel
District Manager
3517 W. Bell Road
Phoenix, AZ 85053
Visit our Website
702-290-7127
Member Since: 2019

Contact Form  More Info  Map 

The Savers family of stores is a for-profit, global thrift retailer offering great quality, gently used clothing, accessories and household goods. Our business model of purchasing, reselling and recycling gives communities a smart way to shop and keeps more than 650 million pounds of used goods from landfills each year.

We also help more than 120 nonprofit organizations by paying them for donated goods, which supports their vital community programs and services. Our brands comprise Savers (in the U.S), Value Village (in the U.S. and Canada), Unique (in the U.S.), Village des Valeurs (in Quebec) and Savers Australia. 

All in all, we operate over 330 locations and have 22,000 employees.
 


Agua Fria Town Center - Oak Tree Three Investment
Michael Prochelo
Property Manager
NEC of W. Camelback Road & Loop 101
Glendale, AZ 85305
Visit our Website
310-282-0788
Fax: 310-282-0729
Member Since: 2009

Busy Super Wal-Mart Center!

-Freeway power center anchored by a very busy Wal-Mart center.

-1.5 miles south of University of Phoenix Stadium, and 2 miles south of Tanger Outlet Mall, Westgate City Center, Cabella's, and the new Banner Hospital.

-Only discount department store in the immediate area.

-Freeway pylon sign and Camelback Road monument sign.

-Available: 2,400 SF end cap w/ patio possibility.

-Available: 1,100 SF suite, and 4,000 SF suite.


Pinspiration | Peoria
Shellie Small
Owner
6520 W. Happy Valley Road
Suite B-103
Glendale, AZ 85310
Visit our Website
813-943-6842


Member Since: 2020

Pinspiration is a responsive, playful & innovative arts & crafts retail experience aimed at helping customers create trendy & curated DIY projects in a fun, inspiring setting. Pinspiration is "Where Community Meets Creativity".

Pinspiration's hip studio allows customers access to a variety of high-quality art supplies and tools. The Pinspiration staff provide the tools, materials and a clean, inviting and inspiring place to put it all together. Customers can create their own idea on the spot or they can choose from an array of ever-changing monthly project menus based on the most popular "pinned" social media projects and current craft trends. What's more, Pinspiration has it's own wine/beer bar and party room! Pinspiration is a world-class venue for planning truly memorable and entertaining events.


Arizona Highways
Karen Farugia
Director of Sales & Marketing
2039 W. Lewis Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85009
Visit our Website
602-712-2200
602-712-2023
Fax: 480-393-5725
Member Since: 1991

Contact Form  More Info  Map 

Arizona Highways magazines award-winning photography, travel journalism and its steadfast commitment to discovering the states treasures has brought the beauty and splendor of Arizona to visitors and natives alike for more than 80 years. To subscribe, visit www.arizonahighways.com.

Walmart #1532
Missy White
Manager
5845 W. Bell Road
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
602-978-8205
Member Since: 1990

Walmart helps people around the world save money and live better -- anytime and anywhere -- in retail stores, online and through their mobile devices. Each week, more than 245 million customers and members visit our nearly 11,000 stores under 71 banners in 27 countries and e-commerce websites in 11 countries. With fiscal year 2015 net sales of $482.2 billion, Walmart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide.

Find out how innovative thinking, leadership through service, and above all, our commitment to saving people money so they can live better have made us the business we are today and are shaping the company we will be tomorrow.


Hospice of the Valley White Dove Thrift Shoppe
Elizabeth Hutchman
General Manager
17045 N. 59th Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
602-942-0011
Member Since: 2005

Contact Form  More Info  Map 

The White Dove Thrift Shoppe has multiple locations in the Valley for the treasure hunter in you. Each White Dove carries different and unique finds, with more items arriving daily. Stop by often - you never know what you'll find!

The White Dove Thrift Shoppes -named after Hospice of the Valley's dove logo - opened its first store in Phoenix in 2004. A location in Scottsdale followed in 2008, and the Mesa store opened in 2013. We have been recognized by Phoenix New Times as the best place to shop thrift!

Many items sold at The White Dove are donated by family members of patients we have served. The stores offer unique finds for the avid thrifter and treasure hunter. Items also go to patients in need. Anything that cannot be used or sold is donated to other charities.

The White Dove Thrift Shoppes support Hospice of the Valley's mission - bringing comfort and dignity as life nears its end. Sale proceeds fund many specialized and innovative patient-care programs and help lower the cost of charity care. No one is ever turned away, regardless of insurance status or financial means.

Hospice of the Valley is the largest not-for-profit hospice in the nation. We strive to provide the highest quality care to those we serve. Each year we care for nearly 17,000 patients and families throughout Central Arizona, including Greater Phoenix and Northern Pinal County.

To learn more about Hospice of the Valley, please call or visit us online: 602.530.6900 or hov.org.


Ruby Ribbon | Cheryl Belluomo
Cheryl Belluomo
Independent Stylist
DNL
Glendale, AZ
Visit our Website
602-821-2659
Member Since: 2017

Contact Form  More Info  Map 

As a career woman and mom, I spent many years climbing the corporate ladder. And like many other women, I was always on the hunt for clothes that helped me to look and feel my most fabulous. This was no small feat for someone who has struggled with her weight throughout her life.

Several years ago, however, I discovered a secret weapon: shapewear. After many trips back and forth to my local department store, and lots of experimenting, I found a few foundational shapewear pieces that I couldn?t live without. I incorporated these pieces into my daily wardrobe, and was amazed by the boost of confidence they gave me.

Then one day I had an ah-ha moment: I realized it would be fantastic if I could figure out a way to combine shapewear with everyday clothing!

So I tracked down the best and brightest lingerie, fashion and activewear designers, marrying their skills and learning from each along the way, and helped to create a collection of exciting, new shaping basics that can easily work with any woman?s existing wardrobe.

I?m so proud to introduce you to our Ruby Ribbon collection.

Ruby Ribbon was inspired by my simple desire to create a company built around the idea of empowering women to look and feel their best, while going after their dreams.

Let?s all live our dreams together.


Walmart Neighborhood Market #3845
Randall Johnson
Store Manager
6645 W. Peoria Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85302
Visit our Website
623-773-2947
Fax: 623-773-2950
Member Since: 2008

Walmart helps people around the world save money and live better -- anytime and anywhere -- in retail stores, online and through their mobile devices. Each week, more than 245 million customers and members visit our nearly 11,000 stores under 71 banners in 27 countries and e-commerce websites in 11 countries. With fiscal year 2015 net sales of $482.2 billion, Walmart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide.

Find out how innovative thinking, leadership through service, and above all, our commitment to saving people money so they can live better have made us the business we are today and are shaping the company we will be tomorrow.


MG Tires, LLC
Tony Singh
Owner
7138 N. 110th Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85307
Visit our Website
833-201-9090
Fax: 623-932-4344
Member Since: 2020

Here at MG Tires, We pride ourselves in being family owned. Our roots have been firmly planted in the trucking and logistics industry since 1982.

We have one rule, and that is the Golden Rule. We treat others how we would want to be treated in life and in business. This business grew out of necessity. We started in the transportation arena in the 1980's, and that has grown into a fleet of nationwide trucks and owner-operators. During this time, it also became apparent that we did not have any convenient or consistent allies or options that could handle or solves the issues and needs in Arizona that arise on any given day in the transportation industry. We decided to address our needs as well as that of our friends in the industry.

Having a fleet of 80 trucks and 120 trailers, that is a total of 1760 tires we need to constantly change. That costs a lot of money buying them from the current tire distributors. We thought to ourselves - there has to be a cheaper way. We started importing tires from JK Tyres in 2017 at a much better price. Thousands of miles later, not a quality issue with any of our trucks.

With this breakthrough, MG Tires was established as the exclusive distributor of JK Tyres in Arizona, USA with the mission to help fellow trucking companies reduce tire replacement cost significantly. Being in an industry where profit margins are razor thin, we understand how crucial it is to save money in any aspect of the operation without compromising safety and quality of service.


Fry's Food Stores of Arizona, Inc. #6
Store Manager
5771 W. Thunderbird Road
Glendale, AZ 85306
Visit our Website
602-978-9488
Member Since: 2016

History of Kroger
In 1883, Barney Kroger invested his life savings of $372 to open a grocery store at 66 Pearl Street in downtown Cincinnati. The son of a merchant, he ran his business with a simple motto: “Be particular. Never sell anything you would not want yourself.”

It was a credo that would serve The Kroger Co. well over the next 130 years as the supermarket business evolved into a variety of formats aimed at satisfying the ever-changing needs of shoppers.

With more than 2,400 stores in 31 states under two dozen banners and annual sales of more than $96 billion, Kroger today ranks as one of the world’s largest retailers.

Many aspects of the company’s business today trace their roots to Mr. Kroger’s early efforts to serve his customers. Consider two specialty departments that today are regular fixtures in the company’s supermarkets" bakeries and meat and seafood shops. In the early 1900s, most grocers bought their bread from independent bakeries. But Mr. Kroger, always pursuing quality as the key ingredient for profit, recognized that if he baked his own bread, he could reduce the price for his customers and still make money. So, in 1901, he became the first grocer in the country to establish his own bakeries. He was also the first to sell meats and groceries under one roof.

Mr. Kroger also spied the promise of increasing his income by manufacturing the products he sold. It began in that first Kroger store on Pearl St. When farmers came to town with their produce, he bought far more cabbage than he could expect his customers to buy. He took the cabbage home to his mother who, following her favorite recipe, turned it into tangy sauerkraut that proved hugely popular with his German customers.

The manufacturing effort born in that back room was the beginning of what is today one of the largest food manufacturing businesses in America. Kroger operates 37 food processing facilities that make thousands of products ranging from bread, cookies and milk to soda pop, ice cream and peanut butter. About 40% of the more than 12,000 private-label items found in the company’s stores today are made at one of Kroger’s manufacturing plants. These Corporate Brands today account for an impressive 24% of Kroger’s total store dollar sales, providing the company with a significant strategic advantage.

Yet in many other respects, Mr. Kroger would hardly recognize the company today. In response to customers who want the convenience of one-stop shopping, stores have grown much larger to accommodate more variety and more merchandise. New combination stores, Kroger’s primary format, today average 67,000 square feet or more. The company’s Marketplace stores, which offer expanded general merchandise, average 125,000 square feet, and multi-department stores under the Fred Meyer banner truly tip the scales at over 165,000 square feet.

The shelves today are packed with up to 50,000 items ranging from basic grocery staples to more innovative fare such as organic vegetables, natural foods, and hot meals ready to eat. Kroger operates more than 1,940 in-store pharmacies that fill more than 160 million prescriptions a year. Its floral shops ring up enough business to make Kroger the world’s largest florist. And Kroger has installed fuel centers in more than 1,180 locations to appeal to customers who want to gas up their cars during their shopping trip.

Mergers have played a key role in Kroger’s growth over the years. In 1983, 100 years after the company’s founding, Kroger merged with Dillon Companies Inc. in Kansas to become a coast-to-coast operator of food, drug and convenience stores.

The biggest merger in Kroger’s history came in 1999, when the company teamed up with Fred Meyer, Inc. in a $13 billion deal that created a supermarket chain with the broadest geographic coverage and widest variety of formats in the food retailing industry. The merger also enabled Kroger to generate huge economies of scale in purchasing, manufacturing, information systems and logistics. In an era when many larger mergers failed, the success of the Kroger-Fred Meyer merger stands out.

Today Kroger offers a store format for nearly every kind of shopper. Our formats include supermarkets, multi-department stores, Marketplace stores, price-impact stores, convenience and fine jewelry stores.

Throughout its rich history, Kroger has served as an innovator and pioneer in the food retail industry. During the 1930s, it was the first grocery chain to routinely monitor product quality and scientifically test foods. In 2012, the company’s long-standing commitment to food safety and quality earned it the highly prestigious Black Pearl Award, awarded to only one company each year by the International Association for Food Protection.

In 1972, Kroger became the first grocery retailer in America to test an electronic scanner. It was installed in a store in suburban Cincinnati, and visitors from around the country attended the event. Technology continues to play an important role in Kroger’s store operations today. In just the last few years, Kroger pioneered QueVision, an innovative faster checkout program that has reduced the time customers wait in line to check out, on average, from four minutes in 2010 to less than 30 seconds in stores today.

Also in the ‘70s, the company became the first grocer to formalize consumer research, interviewing 4,000 shoppers the first year. In 2012, the company listened to 1,993,227 customers, who provided invaluable feedback and insights.

Innovation is also at the heart of Kroger’s sustainability efforts, aimed at improving today to protect tomorrow. In the mid-2000s, Kroger created a process to rescue safe, edible fresh products and donate them quickly to local food banks. This innovation has been replicated by other retailers and today fresh products make up more than half of the food distributed nationwide by Feeding America, America’s largest food bank network.

With dozens of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers around the country, Kroger also has one of the largest privately-owned truck fleets in the country. Trucks moving merchandise and supplies among our stores, warehouses and manufacturing plants log nearly 297 million miles annually.

The business principles that made the first Kroger store successful in 1883 ''" service, selection and value ''" continue to guide the company’s operations today. From one tiny grocery store in Cincinnati more than a century ago, Barney Kroger laid the foundation for what today ranks as one of the largest companies in America.


Fry's Food Stores of Arizona, Inc.
DNL
DNL
AZ
Visit our Website
DNL
Member Since: 2016

History of Kroger
In 1883, Barney Kroger invested his life savings of $372 to open a grocery store at 66 Pearl Street in downtown Cincinnati. The son of a merchant, he ran his business with a simple motto: ?Be particular. Never sell anything you would not want yourself.?

It was a credo that would serve The Kroger Co. well over the next 130 years as the supermarket business evolved into a variety of formats aimed at satisfying the ever-changing needs of shoppers.

With more than 2,400 stores in 31 states under two dozen banners and annual sales of more than $96 billion, Kroger today ranks as one of the world?s largest retailers.

Many aspects of the company?s business today trace their roots to Mr. Kroger?s early efforts to serve his customers. Consider two specialty departments that today are regular fixtures in the company?s supermarkets" bakeries and meat and seafood shops. In the early 1900s, most grocers bought their bread from independent bakeries. But Mr. Kroger, always pursuing quality as the key ingredient for profit, recognized that if he baked his own bread, he could reduce the price for his customers and still make money. So, in 1901, he became the first grocer in the country to establish his own bakeries. He was also the first to sell meats and groceries under one roof.

Mr. Kroger also spied the promise of increasing his income by manufacturing the products he sold. It began in that first Kroger store on Pearl St. When farmers came to town with their produce, he bought far more cabbage than he could expect his customers to buy. He took the cabbage home to his mother who, following her favorite recipe, turned it into tangy sauerkraut that proved hugely popular with his German customers.

The manufacturing effort born in that back room was the beginning of what is today one of the largest food manufacturing businesses in America. Kroger operates 37 food processing facilities that make thousands of products ranging from bread, cookies and milk to soda pop, ice cream and peanut butter. About 40% of the more than 12,000 private-label items found in the company?s stores today are made at one of Kroger?s manufacturing plants. These Corporate Brands today account for an impressive 24% of Kroger?s total store dollar sales, providing the company with a significant strategic advantage.

Yet in many other respects, Mr. Kroger would hardly recognize the company today. In response to customers who want the convenience of one-stop shopping, stores have grown much larger to accommodate more variety and more merchandise. New combination stores, Kroger?s primary format, today average 67,000 square feet or more. The company?s Marketplace stores, which offer expanded general merchandise, average 125,000 square feet, and multi-department stores under the Fred Meyer banner truly tip the scales at over 165,000 square feet.

The shelves today are packed with up to 50,000 items ranging from basic grocery staples to more innovative fare such as organic vegetables, natural foods, and hot meals ready to eat. Kroger operates more than 1,940 in-store pharmacies that fill more than 160 million prescriptions a year. Its floral shops ring up enough business to make Kroger the world?s largest florist. And Kroger has installed fuel centers in more than 1,180 locations to appeal to customers who want to gas up their cars during their shopping trip.

Mergers have played a key role in Kroger?s growth over the years. In 1983, 100 years after the company?s founding, Kroger merged with Dillon Companies Inc. in Kansas to become a coast-to-coast operator of food, drug and convenience stores.

The biggest merger in Kroger?s history came in 1999, when the company teamed up with Fred Meyer, Inc. in a $13 billion deal that created a supermarket chain with the broadest geographic coverage and widest variety of formats in the food retailing industry. The merger also enabled Kroger to generate huge economies of scale in purchasing, manufacturing, information systems and logistics. In an era when many larger mergers failed, the success of the Kroger-Fred Meyer merger stands out.

Today Kroger offers a store format for nearly every kind of shopper. Our formats include supermarkets, multi-department stores, Marketplace stores, price-impact stores, convenience and fine jewelry stores.

Throughout its rich history, Kroger has served as an innovator and pioneer in the food retail industry. During the 1930s, it was the first grocery chain to routinely monitor product quality and scientifically test foods. In 2012, the company?s long-standing commitment to food safety and quality earned it the highly prestigious Black Pearl Award, awarded to only one company each year by the International Association for Food Protection.

In 1972, Kroger became the first grocery retailer in America to test an electronic scanner. It was installed in a store in suburban Cincinnati, and visitors from around the country attended the event. Technology continues to play an important role in Kroger?s store operations today. In just the last few years, Kroger pioneered QueVision, an innovative faster checkout program that has reduced the time customers wait in line to check out, on average, from four minutes in 2010 to less than 30 seconds in stores today.

Also in the ?70s, the company became the first grocer to formalize consumer research, interviewing 4,000 shoppers the first year. In 2012, the company listened to 1,993,227 customers, who provided invaluable feedback and insights.

Innovation is also at the heart of Kroger?s sustainability efforts, aimed at improving today to protect tomorrow. In the mid-2000s, Kroger created a process to rescue safe, edible fresh products and donate them quickly to local food banks. This innovation has been replicated by other retailers and today fresh products make up more than half of the food distributed nationwide by Feeding America, America?s largest food bank network.

With dozens of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers around the country, Kroger also has one of the largest privately-owned truck fleets in the country. Trucks moving merchandise and supplies among our stores, warehouses and manufacturing plants log nearly 297 million miles annually.

The business principles that made the first Kroger store successful in 1883 ''" service, selection and value ''" continue to guide the company?s operations today. From one tiny grocery store in Cincinnati more than a century ago, Barney Kroger laid the foundation for what today ranks as one of the largest companies in America.


Walmart Neighborhood Market #3844
Robert Sturman
Store Manager
5137 W. Olive Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85302
Visit our Website
623-939-4237
Member Since: 2005

Walmart helps people around the world save money and live better -- anytime and anywhere -- in retail stores, online and through their mobile devices. Each week, more than 245 million customers and members visit our nearly 11,000 stores under 71 banners in 27 countries and e-commerce websites in 11 countries. With fiscal year 2015 net sales of $482.2 billion, Walmart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide.

Find out how innovative thinking, leadership through service, and above all, our commitment to saving people money so they can live better have made us the business we are today and are shaping the company we will be tomorrow.


Fry's Food Stores of Arizona, Inc. #60
Store Manager
20220 N. 59th Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-825-3111
Member Since: 2016

History of Kroger
In 1883, Barney Kroger invested his life savings of $372 to open a grocery store at 66 Pearl Street in downtown Cincinnati. The son of a merchant, he ran his business with a simple motto: “Be particular. Never sell anything you would not want yourself.”

It was a credo that would serve The Kroger Co. well over the next 130 years as the supermarket business evolved into a variety of formats aimed at satisfying the ever-changing needs of shoppers.

With more than 2,400 stores in 31 states under two dozen banners and annual sales of more than $96 billion, Kroger today ranks as one of the world’s largest retailers.

Many aspects of the company’s business today trace their roots to Mr. Kroger’s early efforts to serve his customers. Consider two specialty departments that today are regular fixtures in the company’s supermarkets" bakeries and meat and seafood shops. In the early 1900s, most grocers bought their bread from independent bakeries. But Mr. Kroger, always pursuing quality as the key ingredient for profit, recognized that if he baked his own bread, he could reduce the price for his customers and still make money. So, in 1901, he became the first grocer in the country to establish his own bakeries. He was also the first to sell meats and groceries under one roof.

Mr. Kroger also spied the promise of increasing his income by manufacturing the products he sold. It began in that first Kroger store on Pearl St. When farmers came to town with their produce, he bought far more cabbage than he could expect his customers to buy. He took the cabbage home to his mother who, following her favorite recipe, turned it into tangy sauerkraut that proved hugely popular with his German customers.

The manufacturing effort born in that back room was the beginning of what is today one of the largest food manufacturing businesses in America. Kroger operates 37 food processing facilities that make thousands of products ranging from bread, cookies and milk to soda pop, ice cream and peanut butter. About 40% of the more than 12,000 private-label items found in the company’s stores today are made at one of Kroger’s manufacturing plants. These Corporate Brands today account for an impressive 24% of Kroger’s total store dollar sales, providing the company with a significant strategic advantage.

Yet in many other respects, Mr. Kroger would hardly recognize the company today. In response to customers who want the convenience of one-stop shopping, stores have grown much larger to accommodate more variety and more merchandise. New combination stores, Kroger’s primary format, today average 67,000 square feet or more. The company’s Marketplace stores, which offer expanded general merchandise, average 125,000 square feet, and multi-department stores under the Fred Meyer banner truly tip the scales at over 165,000 square feet.

The shelves today are packed with up to 50,000 items ranging from basic grocery staples to more innovative fare such as organic vegetables, natural foods, and hot meals ready to eat. Kroger operates more than 1,940 in-store pharmacies that fill more than 160 million prescriptions a year. Its floral shops ring up enough business to make Kroger the world’s largest florist. And Kroger has installed fuel centers in more than 1,180 locations to appeal to customers who want to gas up their cars during their shopping trip.

Mergers have played a key role in Kroger’s growth over the years. In 1983, 100 years after the company’s founding, Kroger merged with Dillon Companies Inc. in Kansas to become a coast-to-coast operator of food, drug and convenience stores.

The biggest merger in Kroger’s history came in 1999, when the company teamed up with Fred Meyer, Inc. in a $13 billion deal that created a supermarket chain with the broadest geographic coverage and widest variety of formats in the food retailing industry. The merger also enabled Kroger to generate huge economies of scale in purchasing, manufacturing, information systems and logistics. In an era when many larger mergers failed, the success of the Kroger-Fred Meyer merger stands out.

Today Kroger offers a store format for nearly every kind of shopper. Our formats include supermarkets, multi-department stores, Marketplace stores, price-impact stores, convenience and fine jewelry stores.

Throughout its rich history, Kroger has served as an innovator and pioneer in the food retail industry. During the 1930s, it was the first grocery chain to routinely monitor product quality and scientifically test foods. In 2012, the company’s long-standing commitment to food safety and quality earned it the highly prestigious Black Pearl Award, awarded to only one company each year by the International Association for Food Protection.

In 1972, Kroger became the first grocery retailer in America to test an electronic scanner. It was installed in a store in suburban Cincinnati, and visitors from around the country attended the event. Technology continues to play an important role in Kroger’s store operations today. In just the last few years, Kroger pioneered QueVision, an innovative faster checkout program that has reduced the time customers wait in line to check out, on average, from four minutes in 2010 to less than 30 seconds in stores today.

Also in the ‘70s, the company became the first grocer to formalize consumer research, interviewing 4,000 shoppers the first year. In 2012, the company listened to 1,993,227 customers, who provided invaluable feedback and insights.

Innovation is also at the heart of Kroger’s sustainability efforts, aimed at improving today to protect tomorrow. In the mid-2000s, Kroger created a process to rescue safe, edible fresh products and donate them quickly to local food banks. This innovation has been replicated by other retailers and today fresh products make up more than half of the food distributed nationwide by Feeding America, America’s largest food bank network.

With dozens of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers around the country, Kroger also has one of the largest privately-owned truck fleets in the country. Trucks moving merchandise and supplies among our stores, warehouses and manufacturing plants log nearly 297 million miles annually.

The business principles that made the first Kroger store successful in 1883 ''" service, selection and value ''" continue to guide the company’s operations today. From one tiny grocery store in Cincinnati more than a century ago, Barney Kroger laid the foundation for what today ranks as one of the largest companies in America.


Sam's Club #6606
Ralna Maria Hondonero
Marketing Lead
8340 W. McDowell Road
Phoenix, AZ 85037
Visit our Website
623-936-8799
Member Since: 2008

At Sam’s Club, we’re committed to being the most valued membership organization in the world by saving members money on the items they buy most and surprising members with the unexpected find. Each week our 110,000 associates across the U.S. and Puerto Rico provide legendary member service to members -- in our clubs, online and through mobile and tablet devices.


Walmart Neighborhood Market #4233
Michael Spencer
Store Manager
6550 W. Happy Valley Road
Glendale, AZ 85310
Visit our Website
623-566-9754
Member Since: 2005

Walmart helps people around the world save money and live better -- anytime and anywhere -- in retail stores, online and through their mobile devices. Each week, more than 245 million customers and members visit our nearly 11,000 stores under 71 banners in 27 countries and e-commerce websites in 11 countries. With fiscal year 2015 net sales of $482.2 billion, Walmart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide.

Find out how innovative thinking, leadership through service, and above all, our commitment to saving people money so they can live better have made us the business we are today and are shaping the company we will be tomorrow.


Fry's Food Stores of Arizona, Inc. #11
Store Manager
6710 W. Bethany Home Road
Glendale, AZ 85303
Visit our Website
623-934-0348
Member Since: 2016

History of Kroger
In 1883, Barney Kroger invested his life savings of $372 to open a grocery store at 66 Pearl Street in downtown Cincinnati. The son of a merchant, he ran his business with a simple motto: “Be particular. Never sell anything you would not want yourself.”

It was a credo that would serve The Kroger Co. well over the next 130 years as the supermarket business evolved into a variety of formats aimed at satisfying the ever-changing needs of shoppers.

With more than 2,400 stores in 31 states under two dozen banners and annual sales of more than $96 billion, Kroger today ranks as one of the world’s largest retailers.

Many aspects of the company’s business today trace their roots to Mr. Kroger’s early efforts to serve his customers. Consider two specialty departments that today are regular fixtures in the company’s supermarkets" bakeries and meat and seafood shops. In the early 1900s, most grocers bought their bread from independent bakeries. But Mr. Kroger, always pursuing quality as the key ingredient for profit, recognized that if he baked his own bread, he could reduce the price for his customers and still make money. So, in 1901, he became the first grocer in the country to establish his own bakeries. He was also the first to sell meats and groceries under one roof.

Mr. Kroger also spied the promise of increasing his income by manufacturing the products he sold. It began in that first Kroger store on Pearl St. When farmers came to town with their produce, he bought far more cabbage than he could expect his customers to buy. He took the cabbage home to his mother who, following her favorite recipe, turned it into tangy sauerkraut that proved hugely popular with his German customers.

The manufacturing effort born in that back room was the beginning of what is today one of the largest food manufacturing businesses in America. Kroger operates 37 food processing facilities that make thousands of products ranging from bread, cookies and milk to soda pop, ice cream and peanut butter. About 40% of the more than 12,000 private-label items found in the company’s stores today are made at one of Kroger’s manufacturing plants. These Corporate Brands today account for an impressive 24% of Kroger’s total store dollar sales, providing the company with a significant strategic advantage.

Yet in many other respects, Mr. Kroger would hardly recognize the company today. In response to customers who want the convenience of one-stop shopping, stores have grown much larger to accommodate more variety and more merchandise. New combination stores, Kroger’s primary format, today average 67,000 square feet or more. The company’s Marketplace stores, which offer expanded general merchandise, average 125,000 square feet, and multi-department stores under the Fred Meyer banner truly tip the scales at over 165,000 square feet.

The shelves today are packed with up to 50,000 items ranging from basic grocery staples to more innovative fare such as organic vegetables, natural foods, and hot meals ready to eat. Kroger operates more than 1,940 in-store pharmacies that fill more than 160 million prescriptions a year. Its floral shops ring up enough business to make Kroger the world’s largest florist. And Kroger has installed fuel centers in more than 1,180 locations to appeal to customers who want to gas up their cars during their shopping trip.

Mergers have played a key role in Kroger’s growth over the years. In 1983, 100 years after the company’s founding, Kroger merged with Dillon Companies Inc. in Kansas to become a coast-to-coast operator of food, drug and convenience stores.

The biggest merger in Kroger’s history came in 1999, when the company teamed up with Fred Meyer, Inc. in a $13 billion deal that created a supermarket chain with the broadest geographic coverage and widest variety of formats in the food retailing industry. The merger also enabled Kroger to generate huge economies of scale in purchasing, manufacturing, information systems and logistics. In an era when many larger mergers failed, the success of the Kroger-Fred Meyer merger stands out.

Today Kroger offers a store format for nearly every kind of shopper. Our formats include supermarkets, multi-department stores, Marketplace stores, price-impact stores, convenience and fine jewelry stores.

Throughout its rich history, Kroger has served as an innovator and pioneer in the food retail industry. During the 1930s, it was the first grocery chain to routinely monitor product quality and scientifically test foods. In 2012, the company’s long-standing commitment to food safety and quality earned it the highly prestigious Black Pearl Award, awarded to only one company each year by the International Association for Food Protection.

In 1972, Kroger became the first grocery retailer in America to test an electronic scanner. It was installed in a store in suburban Cincinnati, and visitors from around the country attended the event. Technology continues to play an important role in Kroger’s store operations today. In just the last few years, Kroger pioneered QueVision, an innovative faster checkout program that has reduced the time customers wait in line to check out, on average, from four minutes in 2010 to less than 30 seconds in stores today.

Also in the ‘70s, the company became the first grocer to formalize consumer research, interviewing 4,000 shoppers the first year. In 2012, the company listened to 1,993,227 customers, who provided invaluable feedback and insights.

Innovation is also at the heart of Kroger’s sustainability efforts, aimed at improving today to protect tomorrow. In the mid-2000s, Kroger created a process to rescue safe, edible fresh products and donate them quickly to local food banks. This innovation has been replicated by other retailers and today fresh products make up more than half of the food distributed nationwide by Feeding America, America’s largest food bank network.

With dozens of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers around the country, Kroger also has one of the largest privately-owned truck fleets in the country. Trucks moving merchandise and supplies among our stores, warehouses and manufacturing plants log nearly 297 million miles annually.

The business principles that made the first Kroger store successful in 1883 ''" service, selection and value ''" continue to guide the company’s operations today. From one tiny grocery store in Cincinnati more than a century ago, Barney Kroger laid the foundation for what today ranks as one of the largest companies in America.


Fry's Food Stores of Arizona, Inc. #73
Store Manager
6625 W. Happy Valley Road
Glendale, AZ 85310
Visit our Website
623-561-8905
Member Since: 2016

History of Kroger
In 1883, Barney Kroger invested his life savings of $372 to open a grocery store at 66 Pearl Street in downtown Cincinnati. The son of a merchant, he ran his business with a simple motto: “Be particular. Never sell anything you would not want yourself.”

It was a credo that would serve The Kroger Co. well over the next 130 years as the supermarket business evolved into a variety of formats aimed at satisfying the ever-changing needs of shoppers.

With more than 2,400 stores in 31 states under two dozen banners and annual sales of more than $96 billion, Kroger today ranks as one of the world’s largest retailers.

Many aspects of the company’s business today trace their roots to Mr. Kroger’s early efforts to serve his customers. Consider two specialty departments that today are regular fixtures in the company’s supermarkets" bakeries and meat and seafood shops. In the early 1900s, most grocers bought their bread from independent bakeries. But Mr. Kroger, always pursuing quality as the key ingredient for profit, recognized that if he baked his own bread, he could reduce the price for his customers and still make money. So, in 1901, he became the first grocer in the country to establish his own bakeries. He was also the first to sell meats and groceries under one roof.

Mr. Kroger also spied the promise of increasing his income by manufacturing the products he sold. It began in that first Kroger store on Pearl St. When farmers came to town with their produce, he bought far more cabbage than he could expect his customers to buy. He took the cabbage home to his mother who, following her favorite recipe, turned it into tangy sauerkraut that proved hugely popular with his German customers.

The manufacturing effort born in that back room was the beginning of what is today one of the largest food manufacturing businesses in America. Kroger operates 37 food processing facilities that make thousands of products ranging from bread, cookies and milk to soda pop, ice cream and peanut butter. About 40% of the more than 12,000 private-label items found in the company’s stores today are made at one of Kroger’s manufacturing plants. These Corporate Brands today account for an impressive 24% of Kroger’s total store dollar sales, providing the company with a significant strategic advantage.

Yet in many other respects, Mr. Kroger would hardly recognize the company today. In response to customers who want the convenience of one-stop shopping, stores have grown much larger to accommodate more variety and more merchandise. New combination stores, Kroger’s primary format, today average 67,000 square feet or more. The company’s Marketplace stores, which offer expanded general merchandise, average 125,000 square feet, and multi-department stores under the Fred Meyer banner truly tip the scales at over 165,000 square feet.

The shelves today are packed with up to 50,000 items ranging from basic grocery staples to more innovative fare such as organic vegetables, natural foods, and hot meals ready to eat. Kroger operates more than 1,940 in-store pharmacies that fill more than 160 million prescriptions a year. Its floral shops ring up enough business to make Kroger the world’s largest florist. And Kroger has installed fuel centers in more than 1,180 locations to appeal to customers who want to gas up their cars during their shopping trip.

Mergers have played a key role in Kroger’s growth over the years. In 1983, 100 years after the company’s founding, Kroger merged with Dillon Companies Inc. in Kansas to become a coast-to-coast operator of food, drug and convenience stores.

The biggest merger in Kroger’s history came in 1999, when the company teamed up with Fred Meyer, Inc. in a $13 billion deal that created a supermarket chain with the broadest geographic coverage and widest variety of formats in the food retailing industry. The merger also enabled Kroger to generate huge economies of scale in purchasing, manufacturing, information systems and logistics. In an era when many larger mergers failed, the success of the Kroger-Fred Meyer merger stands out.

Today Kroger offers a store format for nearly every kind of shopper. Our formats include supermarkets, multi-department stores, Marketplace stores, price-impact stores, convenience and fine jewelry stores.

Throughout its rich history, Kroger has served as an innovator and pioneer in the food retail industry. During the 1930s, it was the first grocery chain to routinely monitor product quality and scientifically test foods. In 2012, the company’s long-standing commitment to food safety and quality earned it the highly prestigious Black Pearl Award, awarded to only one company each year by the International Association for Food Protection.

In 1972, Kroger became the first grocery retailer in America to test an electronic scanner. It was installed in a store in suburban Cincinnati, and visitors from around the country attended the event. Technology continues to play an important role in Kroger’s store operations today. In just the last few years, Kroger pioneered QueVision, an innovative faster checkout program that has reduced the time customers wait in line to check out, on average, from four minutes in 2010 to less than 30 seconds in stores today.

Also in the ‘70s, the company became the first grocer to formalize consumer research, interviewing 4,000 shoppers the first year. In 2012, the company listened to 1,993,227 customers, who provided invaluable feedback and insights.

Innovation is also at the heart of Kroger’s sustainability efforts, aimed at improving today to protect tomorrow. In the mid-2000s, Kroger created a process to rescue safe, edible fresh products and donate them quickly to local food banks. This innovation has been replicated by other retailers and today fresh products make up more than half of the food distributed nationwide by Feeding America, America’s largest food bank network.

With dozens of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers around the country, Kroger also has one of the largest privately-owned truck fleets in the country. Trucks moving merchandise and supplies among our stores, warehouses and manufacturing plants log nearly 297 million miles annually.

The business principles that made the first Kroger store successful in 1883 ''" service, selection and value ''" continue to guide the company’s operations today. From one tiny grocery store in Cincinnati more than a century ago, Barney Kroger laid the foundation for what today ranks as one of the largest companies in America.


Fry's Food Stores of Arizona, Inc. #26
Store Manager
5116 W. Olive Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85302
Visit our Website
623-934-1862
Member Since: 2016

History of Kroger
In 1883, Barney Kroger invested his life savings of $372 to open a grocery store at 66 Pearl Street in downtown Cincinnati. The son of a merchant, he ran his business with a simple motto: “Be particular. Never sell anything you would not want yourself.”

It was a credo that would serve The Kroger Co. well over the next 130 years as the supermarket business evolved into a variety of formats aimed at satisfying the ever-changing needs of shoppers.

With more than 2,400 stores in 31 states under two dozen banners and annual sales of more than $96 billion, Kroger today ranks as one of the world’s largest retailers.

Many aspects of the company’s business today trace their roots to Mr. Kroger’s early efforts to serve his customers. Consider two specialty departments that today are regular fixtures in the company’s supermarkets" bakeries and meat and seafood shops. In the early 1900s, most grocers bought their bread from independent bakeries. But Mr. Kroger, always pursuing quality as the key ingredient for profit, recognized that if he baked his own bread, he could reduce the price for his customers and still make money. So, in 1901, he became the first grocer in the country to establish his own bakeries. He was also the first to sell meats and groceries under one roof.

Mr. Kroger also spied the promise of increasing his income by manufacturing the products he sold. It began in that first Kroger store on Pearl St. When farmers came to town with their produce, he bought far more cabbage than he could expect his customers to buy. He took the cabbage home to his mother who, following her favorite recipe, turned it into tangy sauerkraut that proved hugely popular with his German customers.

The manufacturing effort born in that back room was the beginning of what is today one of the largest food manufacturing businesses in America. Kroger operates 37 food processing facilities that make thousands of products ranging from bread, cookies and milk to soda pop, ice cream and peanut butter. About 40% of the more than 12,000 private-label items found in the company’s stores today are made at one of Kroger’s manufacturing plants. These Corporate Brands today account for an impressive 24% of Kroger’s total store dollar sales, providing the company with a significant strategic advantage.

Yet in many other respects, Mr. Kroger would hardly recognize the company today. In response to customers who want the convenience of one-stop shopping, stores have grown much larger to accommodate more variety and more merchandise. New combination stores, Kroger’s primary format, today average 67,000 square feet or more. The company’s Marketplace stores, which offer expanded general merchandise, average 125,000 square feet, and multi-department stores under the Fred Meyer banner truly tip the scales at over 165,000 square feet.

The shelves today are packed with up to 50,000 items ranging from basic grocery staples to more innovative fare such as organic vegetables, natural foods, and hot meals ready to eat. Kroger operates more than 1,940 in-store pharmacies that fill more than 160 million prescriptions a year. Its floral shops ring up enough business to make Kroger the world’s largest florist. And Kroger has installed fuel centers in more than 1,180 locations to appeal to customers who want to gas up their cars during their shopping trip.

Mergers have played a key role in Kroger’s growth over the years. In 1983, 100 years after the company’s founding, Kroger merged with Dillon Companies Inc. in Kansas to become a coast-to-coast operator of food, drug and convenience stores.

The biggest merger in Kroger’s history came in 1999, when the company teamed up with Fred Meyer, Inc. in a $13 billion deal that created a supermarket chain with the broadest geographic coverage and widest variety of formats in the food retailing industry. The merger also enabled Kroger to generate huge economies of scale in purchasing, manufacturing, information systems and logistics. In an era when many larger mergers failed, the success of the Kroger-Fred Meyer merger stands out.

Today Kroger offers a store format for nearly every kind of shopper. Our formats include supermarkets, multi-department stores, Marketplace stores, price-impact stores, convenience and fine jewelry stores.

Throughout its rich history, Kroger has served as an innovator and pioneer in the food retail industry. During the 1930s, it was the first grocery chain to routinely monitor product quality and scientifically test foods. In 2012, the company’s long-standing commitment to food safety and quality earned it the highly prestigious Black Pearl Award, awarded to only one company each year by the International Association for Food Protection.

In 1972, Kroger became the first grocery retailer in America to test an electronic scanner. It was installed in a store in suburban Cincinnati, and visitors from around the country attended the event. Technology continues to play an important role in Kroger’s store operations today. In just the last few years, Kroger pioneered QueVision, an innovative faster checkout program that has reduced the time customers wait in line to check out, on average, from four minutes in 2010 to less than 30 seconds in stores today.

Also in the ‘70s, the company became the first grocer to formalize consumer research, interviewing 4,000 shoppers the first year. In 2012, the company listened to 1,993,227 customers, who provided invaluable feedback and insights.

Innovation is also at the heart of Kroger’s sustainability efforts, aimed at improving today to protect tomorrow. In the mid-2000s, Kroger created a process to rescue safe, edible fresh products and donate them quickly to local food banks. This innovation has been replicated by other retailers and today fresh products make up more than half of the food distributed nationwide by Feeding America, America’s largest food bank network.

With dozens of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers around the country, Kroger also has one of the largest privately-owned truck fleets in the country. Trucks moving merchandise and supplies among our stores, warehouses and manufacturing plants log nearly 297 million miles annually.

The business principles that made the first Kroger store successful in 1883 ''" service, selection and value ''" continue to guide the company’s operations today. From one tiny grocery store in Cincinnati more than a century ago, Barney Kroger laid the foundation for what today ranks as one of the largest companies in America.


Walmart Neighborhood Market #3315
Jason Reed
Store Manager
4230 W. Union Hills Drive
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-869-0779
Member Since: 2005

Walmart helps people around the world save money and live better -- anytime and anywhere -- in retail stores, online and through their mobile devices. Each week, more than 245 million customers and members visit our nearly 11,000 stores under 71 banners in 27 countries and e-commerce websites in 11 countries. With fiscal year 2015 net sales of $482.2 billion, Walmart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide.

Find out how innovative thinking, leadership through service, and above all, our commitment to saving people money so they can live better have made us the business we are today and are shaping the company we will be tomorrow.


Bullfrog Spas
Jodi Rogers
Store Manager
20219 N. 59th Avenue
Suite A-1
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-566-2446
Member Since: 2020

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Bullfrog International, LC is the parent company of the Bullfrog Spas hot tub brand. Bullfrog International designs and manufactures the world's only luxury hot tubs with the patented JetPak Therapy System. JetPaks are modular jetted spa seats that allow the user to customize, interchange and upgrade their hot tub's jetted massages at anytime. Founded in 1996, Bullfrog International is headquartered in the greater Salt Lake City, Utah metro area.

The JetPak Therapy System is backed by six U.S. patents, multiple foreign patents, with other U.S. and foreign patents pending. Bullfrog Spas provide powerful hydrotherapy, legendary reliability, and are extremely energy efficient. Bullfrog International currently distributes, licenses, and retails its products in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Asia, South American, the Caribbean and Europe. Bullfrog International, LC is a privately held company widely regarded as the fastest growing luxury hot tub manufacturer in the world.

Peaceful Body, Peaceful Mind, Peaceful Home

Here at the Glendale location we are ready to serve our community the best in hydrotherapy!


EJ's Auction & Consignment
Erik Hoyer
Owner
5880 W. Bell Road
Suite B
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-878-2003
Fax: 623-878-2006
Member Since: 2014

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Estate auctions, complete auction services, consignment furniture store

Costco Wholesale
Alex Valasakos
Manager
17550 N. 79th Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-776-4003
Fax: 623-776-4017
Member Since: 1988

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WHAT IS COSTCO?

We are a membership warehouse club, dedicated to bringing our members the best possible prices on quality brand-name merchandise. With hundreds of locations worldwide, Costco provides a wide selection of merchandise, plus the convenience of specialty departments and exclusive member services, all designed to make your shopping experience a pleasurable one.

THE HISTORY OF COSTCO

The company's first location, opened in 1976 under the Price Club name, was in a converted airplane hangar on Morena Boulevard in San Diego. Originally serving only small businesses, the company found it could achieve far greater buying clout by also serving a selected audience of non-business members. With that change, the growth of the warehouse club industry was off and running. In 1983, the first Costco warehouse location was opened in Seattle. Costco became the first company ever to grow from zero to $3 billion in sales in less than six years. When Costco and Price Club merged in 1993, the combined company, operating under the name PriceCostco, had 206 locations generating $16 billion in annual sales.

Our operating philosophy has been simple. Keep costs down and pass the savings on to our members. Our large membership base and tremendous buying power, combined with our never-ending quest for efficiency, result in the best possible prices for our members. Since resuming the Costco name in 1997, the company has grown worldwide with total sales in recent fiscal years exceeding $64 billion.


Batteries + Bulbs #338
Mr. George Leigh
Store Manager
Visit our Website
623-979-0532
Fax: 623-979-0538
Member Since: 2014

At Batteries Plus Bulbs, you'll find everything you need. With locations in 46 states and Puerto Rico, we offer personal service along with access to over 45,000 unique battery and light bulb products. Batteries Plus Bulbs has become the single-source supplier for all battery and light bulb power needs.

Fry's Food Stores of Arizona, Inc. #10
Store Manager
4353 W. Bethany Home Road
Glendale, AZ 85301
Visit our Website
623-934-5324
Member Since: 2016

History of Kroger
In 1883, Barney Kroger invested his life savings of $372 to open a grocery store at 66 Pearl Street in downtown Cincinnati. The son of a merchant, he ran his business with a simple motto: “Be particular. Never sell anything you would not want yourself.”

It was a credo that would serve The Kroger Co. well over the next 130 years as the supermarket business evolved into a variety of formats aimed at satisfying the ever-changing needs of shoppers.

With more than 2,400 stores in 31 states under two dozen banners and annual sales of more than $96 billion, Kroger today ranks as one of the world’s largest retailers.

Many aspects of the company’s business today trace their roots to Mr. Kroger’s early efforts to serve his customers. Consider two specialty departments that today are regular fixtures in the company’s supermarkets" bakeries and meat and seafood shops. In the early 1900s, most grocers bought their bread from independent bakeries. But Mr. Kroger, always pursuing quality as the key ingredient for profit, recognized that if he baked his own bread, he could reduce the price for his customers and still make money. So, in 1901, he became the first grocer in the country to establish his own bakeries. He was also the first to sell meats and groceries under one roof.

Mr. Kroger also spied the promise of increasing his income by manufacturing the products he sold. It began in that first Kroger store on Pearl St. When farmers came to town with their produce, he bought far more cabbage than he could expect his customers to buy. He took the cabbage home to his mother who, following her favorite recipe, turned it into tangy sauerkraut that proved hugely popular with his German customers.

The manufacturing effort born in that back room was the beginning of what is today one of the largest food manufacturing businesses in America. Kroger operates 37 food processing facilities that make thousands of products ranging from bread, cookies and milk to soda pop, ice cream and peanut butter. About 40% of the more than 12,000 private-label items found in the company’s stores today are made at one of Kroger’s manufacturing plants. These Corporate Brands today account for an impressive 24% of Kroger’s total store dollar sales, providing the company with a significant strategic advantage.

Yet in many other respects, Mr. Kroger would hardly recognize the company today. In response to customers who want the convenience of one-stop shopping, stores have grown much larger to accommodate more variety and more merchandise. New combination stores, Kroger’s primary format, today average 67,000 square feet or more. The company’s Marketplace stores, which offer expanded general merchandise, average 125,000 square feet, and multi-department stores under the Fred Meyer banner truly tip the scales at over 165,000 square feet.

The shelves today are packed with up to 50,000 items ranging from basic grocery staples to more innovative fare such as organic vegetables, natural foods, and hot meals ready to eat. Kroger operates more than 1,940 in-store pharmacies that fill more than 160 million prescriptions a year. Its floral shops ring up enough business to make Kroger the world’s largest florist. And Kroger has installed fuel centers in more than 1,180 locations to appeal to customers who want to gas up their cars during their shopping trip.

Mergers have played a key role in Kroger’s growth over the years. In 1983, 100 years after the company’s founding, Kroger merged with Dillon Companies Inc. in Kansas to become a coast-to-coast operator of food, drug and convenience stores.

The biggest merger in Kroger’s history came in 1999, when the company teamed up with Fred Meyer, Inc. in a $13 billion deal that created a supermarket chain with the broadest geographic coverage and widest variety of formats in the food retailing industry. The merger also enabled Kroger to generate huge economies of scale in purchasing, manufacturing, information systems and logistics. In an era when many larger mergers failed, the success of the Kroger-Fred Meyer merger stands out.

Today Kroger offers a store format for nearly every kind of shopper. Our formats include supermarkets, multi-department stores, Marketplace stores, price-impact stores, convenience and fine jewelry stores.

Throughout its rich history, Kroger has served as an innovator and pioneer in the food retail industry. During the 1930s, it was the first grocery chain to routinely monitor product quality and scientifically test foods. In 2012, the company’s long-standing commitment to food safety and quality earned it the highly prestigious Black Pearl Award, awarded to only one company each year by the International Association for Food Protection.

In 1972, Kroger became the first grocery retailer in America to test an electronic scanner. It was installed in a store in suburban Cincinnati, and visitors from around the country attended the event. Technology continues to play an important role in Kroger’s store operations today. In just the last few years, Kroger pioneered QueVision, an innovative faster checkout program that has reduced the time customers wait in line to check out, on average, from four minutes in 2010 to less than 30 seconds in stores today.

Also in the ‘70s, the company became the first grocer to formalize consumer research, interviewing 4,000 shoppers the first year. In 2012, the company listened to 1,993,227 customers, who provided invaluable feedback and insights.

Innovation is also at the heart of Kroger’s sustainability efforts, aimed at improving today to protect tomorrow. In the mid-2000s, Kroger created a process to rescue safe, edible fresh products and donate them quickly to local food banks. This innovation has been replicated by other retailers and today fresh products make up more than half of the food distributed nationwide by Feeding America, America’s largest food bank network.

With dozens of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers around the country, Kroger also has one of the largest privately-owned truck fleets in the country. Trucks moving merchandise and supplies among our stores, warehouses and manufacturing plants log nearly 297 million miles annually.

The business principles that made the first Kroger store successful in 1883 ''" service, selection and value ''" continue to guide the company’s operations today. From one tiny grocery store in Cincinnati more than a century ago, Barney Kroger laid the foundation for what today ranks as one of the largest companies in America.


Carrie's Salon
Carrie Vogelsang
Owner/Operator
7163 N. 58th Drive
Suite B
Glendale, AZ 85301
Visit our Website
623-606-0289
Member Since: 2014

Contact Form  More Info  Map 

As a native of Arizona growing up in the sunny, dry climate, I learned at an early age the importance of taking care of your skin. Having been a licensed cosmetologist since 1976 and teaching skin care and hair styling to others, I am very excited to provide a salon experience you will enjoy. I am committed to continuing my education, and offering products high in value and performance that will ensure you receive the results you are looking to achieve.

-Carrie Vogelsang, Owner/Operator
-Licensed AZ Cosmetologist
-Dermalogica Expert


Citadelle Plaza
Iain Kenny
Property Manager
19420 N. 59th Avenue
Suite C-275
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
480-993-5714
480-398-2543
Member Since: 2009

This upscale shopping center in Glendale's Arrowhead Ranch area is home to eateries, boutique retail, health and beauty options, and Arizona's only Farmers Market Under the Stars! A family-friendly, pet-friendly shopping and dining experience each Wednesday night. Honeywell and Midwestern University's 144-acre, five-college campus are located across the street.

Staples #0261
Bolivar Soto
General Manager
4350 W. Camelback Road
Glendale, AZ 85301
Visit our Website
623-934-0004
Fax: 623-934-0227
Member Since: 2019

Staples is the world's largest office products company and a trusted source for office solutions, providing products, services and expertise in office supplies, technology, furniture and Copy & Print services. Staples W Camelback Rd offers a first class selection of top brands including Apple, Microsoft, HP, Canon, Epson and Dell. You will find paper, ink and toner and the latest tech and cleaning and breakroom supplies, plus print and copy services in our store. Plan your visit to 4350 W Camelback Rd today!

Bin Mayhem, LLC
Tony Singh
Owner
4377 W. Bell Road
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
602-833-4400
Member Since: 2020

Bin Mayhem is Phoenix's newest and most unique retail concept! Our prices are determined by the day of the week starting on Saturday at $10 and going down each day, until Friday night when we restock our bins to start all over again on Saturday.

You can expect to see brand name products every week, with discounts of 40% to 80% off retail prices!


Sam's Club #4955
Kenna Gering
Store Manager
16573 W. Bell Road
Surprise , AZ 85374
Visit our Website
623-584-0054
Fax: 623-825-9615
Member Since: 2005

At Sam’s Club, we’re committed to being the most valued membership organization in the world by saving members money on the items they buy most and surprising members with the unexpected find. Each week our 110,000 associates across the U.S. and Puerto Rico provide legendary member service to members -- in our clubs, online and through mobile and tablet devices.


Nothing Bundt Cakes - Goodyear
Rob Kelly
13824 W. McDowell Road
Suite 106
Goodyear, AZ 85395
Visit our Website
623-547-7415
Member Since: 2012

Step into a Nothing Bundt Cakes bakery and let the aroma of freshly-baked Bundt stir your senses. Choose from ten luscious Bundt flavors and forty unique cake designs while you browse a treasure trove of unique gifts, charming cards and inspired decorator items. Our nostalgic décor and playful atmosphere make the perfect backdrop to your quest for Bundt perfection.

Cracker Barrel
Dave Christensen
General Manager
9312 W. Glendale Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85305
Visit our Website
623-772-1930
Fax: 623-772-1935
Member Since: 2021

Contact Form  More Info  Map 

Quite simple, really. It starts with quality food served with care. Offering warm welcomes and friendly service. It takes a dedication to pleasing people and treating our guests and staff like family. Maybe that's why, for more than 50 years, millions of folks have trusted Cracker Barrel as a home-away-from-home where they can get a warm, comforting meal. It's a trust we take seriously and couldn't be more grateful for.

And it's a trust we've earned as a homegrown business dedicated to treating our guests to the very best - delicious, hand-prepared fare that's sourced with love and served with a smile.


Fry's Food Stores of Arizona, Inc. #28
Store Manager
4315 W. Bell Road
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
602-978-2590
Member Since: 2016

History of Kroger
In 1883, Barney Kroger invested his life savings of $372 to open a grocery store at 66 Pearl Street in downtown Cincinnati. The son of a merchant, he ran his business with a simple motto: “Be particular. Never sell anything you would not want yourself.”

It was a credo that would serve The Kroger Co. well over the next 130 years as the supermarket business evolved into a variety of formats aimed at satisfying the ever-changing needs of shoppers.

With more than 2,400 stores in 31 states under two dozen banners and annual sales of more than $96 billion, Kroger today ranks as one of the world’s largest retailers.

Many aspects of the company’s business today trace their roots to Mr. Kroger’s early efforts to serve his customers. Consider two specialty departments that today are regular fixtures in the company’s supermarkets" bakeries and meat and seafood shops. In the early 1900s, most grocers bought their bread from independent bakeries. But Mr. Kroger, always pursuing quality as the key ingredient for profit, recognized that if he baked his own bread, he could reduce the price for his customers and still make money. So, in 1901, he became the first grocer in the country to establish his own bakeries. He was also the first to sell meats and groceries under one roof.

Mr. Kroger also spied the promise of increasing his income by manufacturing the products he sold. It began in that first Kroger store on Pearl St. When farmers came to town with their produce, he bought far more cabbage than he could expect his customers to buy. He took the cabbage home to his mother who, following her favorite recipe, turned it into tangy sauerkraut that proved hugely popular with his German customers.

The manufacturing effort born in that back room was the beginning of what is today one of the largest food manufacturing businesses in America. Kroger operates 37 food processing facilities that make thousands of products ranging from bread, cookies and milk to soda pop, ice cream and peanut butter. About 40% of the more than 12,000 private-label items found in the company’s stores today are made at one of Kroger’s manufacturing plants. These Corporate Brands today account for an impressive 24% of Kroger’s total store dollar sales, providing the company with a significant strategic advantage.

Yet in many other respects, Mr. Kroger would hardly recognize the company today. In response to customers who want the convenience of one-stop shopping, stores have grown much larger to accommodate more variety and more merchandise. New combination stores, Kroger’s primary format, today average 67,000 square feet or more. The company’s Marketplace stores, which offer expanded general merchandise, average 125,000 square feet, and multi-department stores under the Fred Meyer banner truly tip the scales at over 165,000 square feet.

The shelves today are packed with up to 50,000 items ranging from basic grocery staples to more innovative fare such as organic vegetables, natural foods, and hot meals ready to eat. Kroger operates more than 1,940 in-store pharmacies that fill more than 160 million prescriptions a year. Its floral shops ring up enough business to make Kroger the world’s largest florist. And Kroger has installed fuel centers in more than 1,180 locations to appeal to customers who want to gas up their cars during their shopping trip.

Mergers have played a key role in Kroger’s growth over the years. In 1983, 100 years after the company’s founding, Kroger merged with Dillon Companies Inc. in Kansas to become a coast-to-coast operator of food, drug and convenience stores.

The biggest merger in Kroger’s history came in 1999, when the company teamed up with Fred Meyer, Inc. in a $13 billion deal that created a supermarket chain with the broadest geographic coverage and widest variety of formats in the food retailing industry. The merger also enabled Kroger to generate huge economies of scale in purchasing, manufacturing, information systems and logistics. In an era when many larger mergers failed, the success of the Kroger-Fred Meyer merger stands out.

Today Kroger offers a store format for nearly every kind of shopper. Our formats include supermarkets, multi-department stores, Marketplace stores, price-impact stores, convenience and fine jewelry stores.

Throughout its rich history, Kroger has served as an innovator and pioneer in the food retail industry. During the 1930s, it was the first grocery chain to routinely monitor product quality and scientifically test foods. In 2012, the company’s long-standing commitment to food safety and quality earned it the highly prestigious Black Pearl Award, awarded to only one company each year by the International Association for Food Protection.

In 1972, Kroger became the first grocery retailer in America to test an electronic scanner. It was installed in a store in suburban Cincinnati, and visitors from around the country attended the event. Technology continues to play an important role in Kroger’s store operations today. In just the last few years, Kroger pioneered QueVision, an innovative faster checkout program that has reduced the time customers wait in line to check out, on average, from four minutes in 2010 to less than 30 seconds in stores today.

Also in the ‘70s, the company became the first grocer to formalize consumer research, interviewing 4,000 shoppers the first year. In 2012, the company listened to 1,993,227 customers, who provided invaluable feedback and insights.

Innovation is also at the heart of Kroger’s sustainability efforts, aimed at improving today to protect tomorrow. In the mid-2000s, Kroger created a process to rescue safe, edible fresh products and donate them quickly to local food banks. This innovation has been replicated by other retailers and today fresh products make up more than half of the food distributed nationwide by Feeding America, America’s largest food bank network.

With dozens of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers around the country, Kroger also has one of the largest privately-owned truck fleets in the country. Trucks moving merchandise and supplies among our stores, warehouses and manufacturing plants log nearly 297 million miles annually.

The business principles that made the first Kroger store successful in 1883 ''" service, selection and value ''" continue to guide the company’s operations today. From one tiny grocery store in Cincinnati more than a century ago, Barney Kroger laid the foundation for what today ranks as one of the largest companies in America.


The Tree Of Oil, LLC
Richard Morgan
CFO
13824 W. McDowell Road
Suite 102
Goodyear, AZ 85395
Visit our Website
602-324-7212
Member Since: 2017

Contact Form  More Info  Map 

Our Mission is Simple: to provide the best products and service to our customers at the lowest prices possible. We take great pride in our company, our commitment to customer service and in the products we sell. Our online store is designed to provide you with a safe and secure environment to browse our product catalog.

Walmart #3241
Phil Barber
Store Manager
18551 N. 83rd Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-825-1129
Fax: 623-825-7612
Member Since: 2002

Walmart helps people around the world save money and live better -- anytime and anywhere -- in retail stores, online and through their mobile devices. Each week, more than 245 million customers and members visit our nearly 11,000 stores under 71 banners in 27 countries and e-commerce websites in 11 countries. With fiscal year 2015 net sales of $482.2 billion, Walmart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide.

Find out how innovative thinking, leadership through service, and above all, our commitment to saving people money so they can live better have made us the business we are today and are shaping the company we will be tomorrow.


Sam's Club #4732
Christina Bestul
Marketing Membership Administrator
18501 N. 83rd Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-825-9621
Fax: 623-825-9615
Member Since: 2005

At Sam?s Club, we?re committed to being the most valued membership organization in the world by saving members money on the items they buy most and surprising members with the unexpected find. Each week our 110,000 associates across the U.S. and Puerto Rico provide legendary member service to members -- in our clubs, online and through mobile and tablet devices.

Batteries + Bulbs #338
Phil Vostrejs
General Manager
6680 W. Bell Road
Glendale, AZ 85306
Visit our Website
623-979-0532
Fax: 623-979-0538
Member Since: 2014

At Batteries Plus Bulbs, you'll find everything you need. With locations in 46 states and Puerto Rico, we offer personal service along with access to over 45,000 unique battery and light bulb products. Batteries Plus Bulbs has become the single-source supplier for all battery and light bulb power needs.

Walmart #3465
Tabitha Tatum
5010 N. 95th Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85305
Visit our Website
623-872-0058
Fax: 623-872-0861
Member Since: 2003

Walmart helps people around the world save money and live better -- anytime and anywhere -- in retail stores, online and through their mobile devices. Each week, more than 245 million customers and members visit our nearly 11,000 stores under 71 banners in 27 countries and e-commerce websites in 11 countries. With fiscal year 2015 net sales of $482.2 billion, Walmart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide.

Find out how innovative thinking, leadership through service, and above all, our commitment to saving people money so they can live better have made us the business we are today and are shaping the company we will be tomorrow.


Glendale Flowers and Gifts
Sue Garner
Owner
7163 N. 58th Drive
Glendale, AZ 85301
Visit our Website
623-931-2416
800-983-7143
Fax: 623-951-6956
Member Since: 2013

Contact Form  More Info  Map 

Located in downtown Glendale - you will find a flowershop that fulfills every floral need. Our customer service is our badge of honor and our creativity is the best in town.

Fry's Food Stores of Arizona, Inc. #136
Store Manager
4329 W. Northern Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85301
Visit our Website
623-931-8445
Member Since: 2016

History of Kroger
In 1883, Barney Kroger invested his life savings of $372 to open a grocery store at 66 Pearl Street in downtown Cincinnati. The son of a merchant, he ran his business with a simple motto: “Be particular. Never sell anything you would not want yourself.”

It was a credo that would serve The Kroger Co. well over the next 130 years as the supermarket business evolved into a variety of formats aimed at satisfying the ever-changing needs of shoppers.

With more than 2,400 stores in 31 states under two dozen banners and annual sales of more than $96 billion, Kroger today ranks as one of the world’s largest retailers.

Many aspects of the company’s business today trace their roots to Mr. Kroger’s early efforts to serve his customers. Consider two specialty departments that today are regular fixtures in the company’s supermarkets" bakeries and meat and seafood shops. In the early 1900s, most grocers bought their bread from independent bakeries. But Mr. Kroger, always pursuing quality as the key ingredient for profit, recognized that if he baked his own bread, he could reduce the price for his customers and still make money. So, in 1901, he became the first grocer in the country to establish his own bakeries. He was also the first to sell meats and groceries under one roof.

Mr. Kroger also spied the promise of increasing his income by manufacturing the products he sold. It began in that first Kroger store on Pearl St. When farmers came to town with their produce, he bought far more cabbage than he could expect his customers to buy. He took the cabbage home to his mother who, following her favorite recipe, turned it into tangy sauerkraut that proved hugely popular with his German customers.

The manufacturing effort born in that back room was the beginning of what is today one of the largest food manufacturing businesses in America. Kroger operates 37 food processing facilities that make thousands of products ranging from bread, cookies and milk to soda pop, ice cream and peanut butter. About 40% of the more than 12,000 private-label items found in the company’s stores today are made at one of Kroger’s manufacturing plants. These Corporate Brands today account for an impressive 24% of Kroger’s total store dollar sales, providing the company with a significant strategic advantage.

Yet in many other respects, Mr. Kroger would hardly recognize the company today. In response to customers who want the convenience of one-stop shopping, stores have grown much larger to accommodate more variety and more merchandise. New combination stores, Kroger’s primary format, today average 67,000 square feet or more. The company’s Marketplace stores, which offer expanded general merchandise, average 125,000 square feet, and multi-department stores under the Fred Meyer banner truly tip the scales at over 165,000 square feet.

The shelves today are packed with up to 50,000 items ranging from basic grocery staples to more innovative fare such as organic vegetables, natural foods, and hot meals ready to eat. Kroger operates more than 1,940 in-store pharmacies that fill more than 160 million prescriptions a year. Its floral shops ring up enough business to make Kroger the world’s largest florist. And Kroger has installed fuel centers in more than 1,180 locations to appeal to customers who want to gas up their cars during their shopping trip.

Mergers have played a key role in Kroger’s growth over the years. In 1983, 100 years after the company’s founding, Kroger merged with Dillon Companies Inc. in Kansas to become a coast-to-coast operator of food, drug and convenience stores.

The biggest merger in Kroger’s history came in 1999, when the company teamed up with Fred Meyer, Inc. in a $13 billion deal that created a supermarket chain with the broadest geographic coverage and widest variety of formats in the food retailing industry. The merger also enabled Kroger to generate huge economies of scale in purchasing, manufacturing, information systems and logistics. In an era when many larger mergers failed, the success of the Kroger-Fred Meyer merger stands out.

Today Kroger offers a store format for nearly every kind of shopper. Our formats include supermarkets, multi-department stores, Marketplace stores, price-impact stores, convenience and fine jewelry stores.

Throughout its rich history, Kroger has served as an innovator and pioneer in the food retail industry. During the 1930s, it was the first grocery chain to routinely monitor product quality and scientifically test foods. In 2012, the company’s long-standing commitment to food safety and quality earned it the highly prestigious Black Pearl Award, awarded to only one company each year by the International Association for Food Protection.

In 1972, Kroger became the first grocery retailer in America to test an electronic scanner. It was installed in a store in suburban Cincinnati, and visitors from around the country attended the event. Technology continues to play an important role in Kroger’s store operations today. In just the last few years, Kroger pioneered QueVision, an innovative faster checkout program that has reduced the time customers wait in line to check out, on average, from four minutes in 2010 to less than 30 seconds in stores today.

Also in the ‘70s, the company became the first grocer to formalize consumer research, interviewing 4,000 shoppers the first year. In 2012, the company listened to 1,993,227 customers, who provided invaluable feedback and insights.

Innovation is also at the heart of Kroger’s sustainability efforts, aimed at improving today to protect tomorrow. In the mid-2000s, Kroger created a process to rescue safe, edible fresh products and donate them quickly to local food banks. This innovation has been replicated by other retailers and today fresh products make up more than half of the food distributed nationwide by Feeding America, America’s largest food bank network.

With dozens of manufacturing facilities and distribution centers around the country, Kroger also has one of the largest privately-owned truck fleets in the country. Trucks moving merchandise and supplies among our stores, warehouses and manufacturing plants log nearly 297 million miles annually.

The business principles that made the first Kroger store successful in 1883 ''" service, selection and value ''" continue to guide the company’s operations today. From one tiny grocery store in Cincinnati more than a century ago, Barney Kroger laid the foundation for what today ranks as one of the largest companies in America.


Walmart #5124
Robert Rowe
Store Manager
5605 W. Northern Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85301
Visit our Website
623-934-6920
Fax: 623-934-7924
Member Since: 2004

Walmart helps people around the world save money and live better -- anytime and anywhere -- in retail stores, online and through their mobile devices. Each week, more than 245 million customers and members visit our nearly 11,000 stores under 71 banners in 27 countries and e-commerce websites in 11 countries. With fiscal year 2015 net sales of $482.2 billion, Walmart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide.

Find out how innovative thinking, leadership through service, and above all, our commitment to saving people money so they can live better have made us the business we are today and are shaping the company we will be tomorrow.


Arrowhead Towne Center
Jesse Benitez
Property Manager
7700 W. Arrowhead Towne Center
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-979-7720
Fax: 623-979-4447
Member Since: 1994

Contact Form  More Info  Map 

Arrowhead is everything to northwest Phoenix, with top shopping in a light-filled and airy setting. Great stores are everywhere, including popular department stores Dillard's, JCPenney, Macy's and Sears, plus Dick's Sporting Goods and Forever 21. Add dozens of specialty stores like Aeropostale, American Eagle, Coach, Loft, Oakley, Pac Sun, Sephora and so many more for a complete ? and completely satisfying ? shopping experience. Need more? A 14-screen AMC Theatres and a full-scale food court add to the fun.

Spencers TV & Appliance
Russ Bosworth
Sales
7346 W. Bell Road
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-487-7700
Member Since: 2020

YOU'LL ALWAYS GET A LOWER PRICE
IN 1973, SPENCER'S OPENED ITS FIRST STORE AT THE CORNER OF MACDONALD AND FIRST AVENUE IN MESA, AZ.
For over 45 years we have grown to 10 locations and many people ask how we have survived so long. The answer is simple: personal service and in turn customer satisfaction have always been the focus of our business. Throughout the years, we have been able to work hard with our suppliers to bring the customer the best prices.

There are not many companies you call and be greeted by the owner. That's what happens at Spencer's. Rick wants to be as one-on-one with the customer as his dad was 30 years ago. Rick says, "You can't do that without being toe-to-toe with customers every day. If you don't talk with people, how will you understand what they want?" At Spencer's, customers get the best price and personal attention. That is how we compete with national chains, day-in and day-out. If you haven't been to one of our stores... stop by and see what you are missing!


Staples #0261
Jessica Augustave
Marketing Specialist
4350 W. Camelback Road
Glendale, AZ 85301
Visit our Website
201-308-9805
Fax: 623-934-0227
Member Since: 2019

Staples is the world's largest office products company and a trusted source for office solutions, providing products, services and expertise in office supplies, technology, furniture and Copy & Print services. Staples W Camelback Rd offers a first class selection of top brands including Apple, Microsoft, HP, Canon, Epson and Dell. You will find paper, ink and toner and the latest tech and cleaning and breakroom supplies, plus print and copy services in our store. Plan your visit to 4350 W Camelback Rd today!

Global Home & Garden
Roqia Mansoori
Store Manager
7700 W. Arrowhead Towne Center
Suite 2145
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
602-432-2770
Member Since: 2020

Home and garden decor from around the world featuring wall pieces, lanterns, sculptures and more.

The Astrology Store
Dave Campbell
Owner
5735 W. Glendale Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85301
Visit our Website
623-463-6286
Fax: 623-463-8187
Member Since: 2005

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Books, Gifts, Jewelry, Tarot Readings, Classes and Massage Studio.

Nothing Bundt Cakes - Glendale
Rob Kelly
Owner
5890 W. Thunderbird Road
Suite 101
Glendale, AZ 85306
Visit our Website
602-938-9866
Member Since: 2012

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Step into a Nothing Bundt Cakes bakery and let the aroma of freshly-baked Bundt stir your senses. Choose from ten luscious Bundt flavors and forty unique cake designs while you browse a treasure trove of unique gifts, charming cards and inspired decorator items. Our nostalgic décor and playful atmosphere make the perfect backdrop to your quest for Bundt perfection.

Walmart Neighborhood Market #3314
Judy Gomez-Zimmerman
Store Manager
7450 W. Glendale Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-915-2632
Fax: 623-915-2635
Member Since: 2005

Walmart helps people around the world save money and live better -- anytime and anywhere -- in retail stores, online and through their mobile devices. Each week, more than 245 million customers and members visit our nearly 11,000 stores under 71 banners in 27 countries and e-commerce websites in 11 countries. With fiscal year 2015 net sales of $482.2 billion, Walmart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide.

Find out how innovative thinking, leadership through service, and above all, our commitment to saving people money so they can live better have made us the business we are today and are shaping the company we will be tomorrow.


Ashley Furniture Homestore
Vanessa Fuentes
Office Administrator
6910 W. Bell Road
Suite B
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
602-443-4663
909-572-2185 (corporate)
Member Since: 2020

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Your home is more than a house, it's the daily moments and experiences you share that make it uniquely you.

At Ashley HomeStore, we celebrate being home with you. Our locally owned and operated stores are passionate about being the best and most affordable furniture store for your home.


Walmart Corporate
Peter Abbott
Director, Wal-Mart Corporate Affairs
2501 W. Happy Valley Road
Phoenix, AZ 85058
Visit our Website
623-780-5702
Fax: 602-241-8562
Member Since: 2005

Walmart helps people around the world save money and live better -- anytime and anywhere -- in retail stores, online and through their mobile devices. Each week, more than 245 million customers and members visit our nearly 11,000 stores under 71 banners in 27 countries and e-commerce websites in 11 countries. With fiscal year 2015 net sales of $482.2 billion, Walmart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide.

Find out how innovative thinking, leadership through service, and above all, our commitment to saving people money so they can live better have made us the business we are today and are shaping the company we will be tomorrow.


Costco Wholesale
Rebekah McAtee
Marketing Supervisor
17550 N. 79th Avenue
Glendale, AZ 85308
Visit our Website
623-776-4003
623-776-4004
Fax: 623-776-4017
Member Since: 1988

WHAT IS COSTCO?

We are a membership warehouse club, dedicated to bringing our members the best possible prices on quality brand-name merchandise. With hundreds of locations worldwide, Costco provides a wide selection of merchandise, plus the convenience of specialty departments and exclusive member services, all designed to make your shopping experience a pleasurable one.

THE HISTORY OF COSTCO

The company's first location, opened in 1976 under the Price Club name, was in a converted airplane hangar on Morena Boulevard in San Diego. Originally serving only small businesses, the company found it could achieve far greater buying clout by also serving a selected audience of non-business members. With that change, the growth of the warehouse club industry was off and running. In 1983, the first Costco warehouse location was opened in Seattle. Costco became the first company ever to grow from zero to $3 billion in sales in less than six years. When Costco and Price Club merged in 1993, the combined company, operating under the name PriceCostco, had 206 locations generating $16 billion in annual sales.

Our operating philosophy has been simple. Keep costs down and pass the savings on to our members. Our large membership base and tremendous buying power, combined with our never-ending quest for efficiency, result in the best possible prices for our members. Since resuming the Costco name in 1997, the company has grown worldwide with total sales in recent fiscal years exceeding $64 billion.